Harvest and Food Preservation

strawberry jam

In the current economy, putting food away for winter makes good sense, whether you’re harvesting your own garden or being tempted by the bounty at the farmer’s market. Contrary to what you might think, food preservation doesn’t take a lot of time—you can make jam in less than half an hour! Take an afternoon this summer or fall, and discover the joys of filling your pantry. Invite your friends and make it a harvest party!

Canning For a New Generation: Bold Fresh Flavors for the Modern Pantry

Liana Krissoff

Canning-for-a-New-Generation“When I was growing up, canning was for old folks and cranks and separatists,” writes Liana Krissoff in her introduction to Canning for a New Generation. But not anymore. With soaring food prices and the increasing popularity of all things domestic and DIY, there’s never been a better time to revisit the centuries-old techniques of preserving food at home. This hip, modern handbook is filled with fresh and new ways to preserve nature’s bounty throughout the year. Organized by season and illustrated with beautiful photographs, it offers detailed instructions and recipes for making more than 150 canned, pickled, dried, and frozen foods, as well as 50 inventive recipes for dishes using these foods. Basic information on canning techniques and lively sidebars round out this refreshing take on a classic cooking tradition.

 

Jams and Jellies in Less than 30 Minutes

Pamela Bennett

Jams-Jellies-in-Less-Than-30-MinutesFor the cook who loves to serve something deliciously homemade but has little time to spare, Jams and Jellies in 30 Minutes is the answer—for parties, for holiday meals, and for every day. Whether you’re new to the kitchen or a veteran cook, you will take genuine delight in creating small-batch refrigerator jams that are not only mouthwatering but beautiful as well. In less than half an hour and in very few steps, you can mix up a batch of fruity spreads to savor or to share. Here are methods and recipes for 50 delectable sweet treats. These recipes offer creative possibilities as limitless as your imagination. They are as delicious in the morning on bagels or croissants as they are served during an elegant brunch or bridal shower. And many of these fruity concoctions can complement the perfect roast or grilled meat, turn a marinade or sauce from plain to extraordinary, or make an amazing topping for a dish of ice cream. (Publisher’s Marketing)

 

A Householders Guide to the Universe: A Calendar of Basics for the Home and Beyond

Harriet Fasenfest

Jams-Jellies-in-Less-Than-30-MinutesFasenfest, a former restaurant owner and cook, writes an intimate reflection on a year of “householding,” the art of managing the small-scale economy of a household. The book is organized by month, and each chapter is divided into “Home,” “Kitchen,” and “Garden” sections. Readers will find concrete tips on planting, harvesting, canning, preserving, and cleaning. Fasenfest skillfully cultivates an appreciation for skills that have been lost in our modern quest for convenience, while also showing readers why householding makes sense as an antidote to the destruction of our current economic system. Helpful charts, a scattering of recipes, and personal stories make this hybrid how-to/memoir an enjoyable and informative read for aspiring urban homesteaders as well as those who would rather household vicariously. Readers who enjoyed Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life will find something to appreciate here. (Library Journal)

 

Putting Food By 5th Edition

Janet Greene, Ruth Hertzberd and Beatrice Vaughan

putting-food-byThe completely updated classic shows you how to stock your pantry with local, seasonal ingredients all year long. For more than thirty years, Putting Food By has been the go-to- resource for preserving foods—from fruit and vegetables to meat and seafood. Now this essential volume has been updated to reflect the latest information on equipment, ingredients, health and safety issues, and resources. Whether motivated by economics or the desire to capture the taste of local, seasonal food at its peak, home cooks have made preserving today’s hottest food trend. There are many books on canning, but Putting Food By stands out as the classic that has stood the test of time. Covers canning, freezing, salting, smoking, drying, and root cellaring. Includes mouthwatering recipes for pickles, relishes, jams, and jellies. (Publisher’s Marketing)

 

The Homesteader’s Kitchen: Recipes From Farm to Table

Robin Burnside

the-homesteaders-kitchenIn The Homesteader’s Kitchen, author Robin Burnside presents wholesome recipes and motherly advice for preparing nourishing meals, tasty embellishments, and luscious desserts. Her focus is on using fruits and vegetables from the family garden or the nearby farmers market. She teaches how to turn these local, organic foods into snacks, meals, and treats that nourish the soul as well as the body. From Multigrain Blueberry Pancakes in the morning, a Creamy Mango-Coconut Smoothie for a snack, a crisp Asian Cabbage Salad for lunch, an evening meal of Grilled Wild Salmon Fillet with Thai Cilantro Pesto, to a dessert of Spicy Pear Pie, Burnside offers mouthwatering recipes that are fun to prepare and a joy to eat. The author introduces this cookbook in a way that recognizes the connection between body, mind, emotions, environment, and attitude. Since what we eat has a considerable effect on our well-being, this approach to dining takes into account all that goes into the care of feeding humans, including the benefits and consequences of our choices. As consumers, the foods we buy, where they come from, and how we prepare what we purchase must be considered if we are to create a sustainable future for generations to come. (Publisher’s Marketing)

 

Putting Up More: A Guide to Canning Jams, Relishes, Chutneys, Pickles, Sauces and Salsas

Stephen Palmer Dowdney

Putting-Up-MoreThere is nothing quite so satisfying as opening and savoring the contents of a jar that contains your own specially prepared recipe of home “put up” goodness. It can turn the simplest of fare into exciting “restaurant-grade” presentations while affording superior dining experiences. Putting Up More contains many breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack suggestions, utilizing the recipes you have preserved and stored in the pantry. Each time you sample a jar, you might be lending elegance to what otherwise could have been a common nibble. Even quick, inexpensive, and simple home cooking will become the adventure that dining out used to be, and restaurants once again will become reserved for that very special occasion. Many of the author’s personal successes are presented in this book, along with the best uses for each. The book also includes a step-by-step narrative of how to prepare each recipe. Get ready to put up more! Stephen Dowdney was the owner and chief operator of South Carolina’s premier “small batch” processing and canning company for twelve years. (Publisher’s Marketing)

 

The Joy of Keeping a Root Cellar: Canning, Freezing, Drying, Smoking and Preserving the Harvest

Jennifer Megyesi

the-joy-of-keeping-a-root-cellarThe winning team behind The Joy of Keeping Chickens returns, this time with a complete guide to building and maintaining a root cellar even if it s just a dark and cool closet. This cheap, easy, energy-saving way will keep the harvest fresh all year long. Here, readers will learn:

  • Which fruits and vegetables store best
  • How to build a root cellar in the country, suburbs, or city
  • How to deal with specific environmental challenges
  • Storage techniques ranging from canning to pickling and smoking, to drying
  • Recipes for everything from tomato sauce to venison jerky

Root cellaring isn’t just for off-the-grid types or farmers with large gardens. Storing food makes good sense, both financially and environmentally. And root cellars can easily fit anywhere. In this intelligent, convincing book, authors Megyesi and Hansen show how to make them part of every reader s life. (Publisher’s Marketing)

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